Why We Get Sick

So, if you asked the question in 1900, “Why do we get sick?” the answer, overwhelmingly, would be “infectious diseases.” But this is no longer true. With improved sanitation, personal hygiene, and miraculous medications such as ...

Why We Get Sick

A scientist reveals the groundbreaking evidence linking many major diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease, to a common root cause—insulin resistance—and shares an easy, effective plan to reverse and prevent it. We are sick. Around the world, we struggle with diseases that were once considered rare. Cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer's disease, and diabetes affect millions each year; many people are also struggling with hypertension, weight gain, fatty liver, dementia, low testosterone, menstrual irregularities and infertility, and more. We treat the symptoms, not realizing that all of these diseases and disorders have something in common. Each of them is caused or made worse by a condition known as insulin resistance. And you might have it. Odds are you do—over half of all adults in the United States are insulin resistant, with most other countries either worse or not far behind. In Why We Get Sick, internationally renowned scientist and pathophysiology professor Benjamin Bikman explores why insulin resistance has become so prevalent and why it matters. Unless we recognize it and take steps to reverse the trend, major chronic diseases will be even more widespread. But reversing insulin resistance is possible, and Bikman offers an evidence-based plan to stop and prevent it, with helpful food lists, meal suggestions, easy exercise principles, and more. Full of surprising research and practical advice, Why We Get Sick will help you to take control of your health.

More Books:

Why We Get Sick
Language: en
Pages: 280
Authors: Benjamin Bikman
Categories: Health & Fitness
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-07-21 - Publisher: BenBella Books

A scientist reveals the groundbreaking evidence linking many major diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease, to a common root cause—insulin resistance—and shares an easy, effective plan to reverse and prevent it. We are sick. Around the world, we struggle with diseases that were once considered rare. Cancer, heart disease,
Why We Get Sick
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Randolph M. Nesse, MD, George C. Williams
Categories: Health & Fitness
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-02-08 - Publisher: Vintage

The next time you get sick, consider this before picking up the aspirin: your body may be doing exactly what it's supposed to. In this ground-breaking book, two pioneers of the science of Darwinian medicine argue that illness as well as the factors that predispose us toward it are subject
Why We Get Sick
Language: en
Pages: 280
Authors: Benjamin Bikman
Categories: Health & Fitness
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-09-07 - Publisher: BenBella Books

2020 Foreword Indie Award Honorable Mention in the “Health” Category A scientist reveals the groundbreaking evidence linking many major diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease, to a common root cause—insulin resistance—and shares an easy, effective plan to reverse and prevent it. We are sick. Around the world, we struggle
Why Christians Get Sick
Language: en
Pages: 159
Authors: George Malkmus
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-07-28 - Publisher: Destiny Image Publishers

With a diagnosis of colon cancer, George Malkmus launched an intensive biblical and scientific search to find out why he, a Christian, got sick—and to possibly find an alternative treatment to the medical profession's usually unsuccessful ones. Why Christians Get Sick by George Malkmus, is the most important book Christians
When Doctors Get Sick
Language: en
Pages: 464
Authors: H.N. Mandell, H.M. Spiro
Categories: Medical
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-11-11 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

When a doctor gets sick, his status changes. No longer is his role de fined as deriving from doctus, i. e. , learned, but as from patiens, the present participle of the deponent verb, patior, i. e. , to suffer, with all the passive acceptance of pain the verb implies.