The Mangle of Practice

ture has shown little interest in the transformation of actors in scientific practice, thus tending to enforce by default an image of their identities as nonemergent and persisting unchanged through practice.

The Mangle of Practice

This ambitious book by one of the most original and provocative thinkers in science studies offers a sophisticated new understanding of the nature of scientific, mathematical, and engineering practice and the production of scientific knowledge. Andrew Pickering offers a new approach to the unpredictable nature of change in science, taking into account the extraordinary number of factors—social, technological, conceptual, and natural—that interact to affect the creation of scientific knowledge. In his view, machines, instruments, facts, theories, conceptual and mathematical structures, disciplined practices, and human beings are in constantly shifting relationships with one another—"mangled" together in unforeseeable ways that are shaped by the contingencies of culture, time, and place. Situating material as well as human agency in their larger cultural context, Pickering uses case studies to show how this picture of the open, changeable nature of science advances a richer understanding of scientific work both past and present. Pickering examines in detail the building of the bubble chamber in particle physics, the search for the quark, the construction of the quarternion system in mathematics, and the introduction of computer-controlled machine tools in industry. He uses these examples to address the most basic elements of scientific practice—the development of experimental apparatus, the production of facts, the development of theory, and the interrelation of machines and social organization.

More Books:

The Mangle of Practice
Language: en
Pages: 296
Authors: Andrew Pickering
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-12-15 - Publisher: University of Chicago Press

This ambitious book by one of the most original and provocative thinkers in science studies offers a sophisticated new understanding of the nature of scientific, mathematical, and engineering practice and the production of scientific knowledge. Andrew Pickering offers a new approach to the unpredictable nature of change in science, taking
Mathematics, Science, and Postclassical Theory
Language: en
Pages: 279
Authors: Barbara Herrnstein Smith
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1997-03-04 - Publisher: Duke University Press

A unique collection of essays dealing with the intersections between science and mathematics.
A Nice Derangement of Epistemes
Language: en
Pages: 390
Authors: John H. Zammito
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004-02-15 - Publisher: University of Chicago Press

Since the 1950s, many philosophers of science have attacked positivism—the theory that scientific knowledge is grounded in objective reality. Reconstructing the history of these critiques, John H. Zammito argues that while so-called postpositivist theories of science are very often invoked, they actually provide little support for fashionable postmodern approaches to
The Historiography of the Chemical Revolution
Language: en
Pages: 352
Authors: John G McEvoy
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-10-06 - Publisher: Routledge

This study offers a critical survey of past and present interpretations of the Chemical Revolution designed to lend clarity and direction to the current ferment of views.
The Mangle in Practice
Language: en
Pages: 320
Authors: Andrew Pickering, Keith Guzik
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-01-14 - Publisher: Duke University Press

In The Mangle of Practice (1995), the renowned sociologist of science Andrew Pickering argued for a reconceptualization of research practice as a “mangle,” an open-ended, evolutionary, and performative interplay of human and non-human agency. While Pickering’s ideas originated in science and technology studies, this collection aims to extend the mangle’s