The Flesh of the Word

this phrase and what place it held in his overall argument before the further pejorative implications of Willis and others might be evaluated. In the first edition of the work, Chandieu offers two reasons the finite cannot receive the ...

The Flesh of the Word

The extra Calvinisticum, the doctrine that the eternal Son maintains his existence beyond the flesh both during his earthly ministry and perpetually, divided the Lutheran and Reformed traditions during the Reformation. This book explores the emergence and development of the extra Calvinisticum in the Reformed tradition by tracing its first exposition from Ulrich Zwingli to early Reformed orthodoxy. Rather than being an ancillary issue, the questions surrounding the extra Calvinisticum were a determinative factor in the differentiation of Magisterial Protestantism into rival confessions. Reformed theologians maintained this doctrine in order to preserve the integrity of both Christ's divine and human natures as the mediator between God and humanity. This rationale remained consistent across this period with increasing elaboration and sophistication to meet the challenges leveled against the doctrine in Lutheran polemics. The study begins with Zwingli's early use of the extra Calvinisticum in the Eucharistic controversy with Martin Luther and especially as the alternative to Luther's doctrine of the ubiquity of Christ's human body. Over time, Reformed theologians, such as Peter Martyr Vermigli and Antione de Chandieu, articulated the extra Calvinisticum with increasing rigor by incorporating conciliar christology, the church fathers, and scholastic methodology to address the polemical needs of engagement with Lutheranism. The Flesh of the Word illustrates the development of christological doctrine by Reformed theologians offering a coherent historical narrative of Reformed christology from its emergence into the period of confessionalization. The extra Calvinisticum was interconnected to broader concerns affecting concepts of the union of Christ's natures, the communication of attributes, and the understanding of heaven.

More Books:

The Flesh of the Word
Language: en
Pages: 325
Authors: K.J. Drake
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-04-13 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

The extra Calvinisticum, the doctrine that the eternal Son maintains his existence beyond the flesh both during his earthly ministry and perpetually, divided the Lutheran and Reformed traditions during the Reformation. This book explores the emergence and development of the extra Calvinisticum in the Reformed tradition by tracing its first
The Son of God Beyond the Flesh
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Andrew M. McGinnis
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-07-31 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

The so-called extra Calvinisticum-the doctrine that the incarnate Son of God continued to exist beyond the flesh-was not invented by John Calvin or Reformed theologians. If this is true, as is almost universally acknowledged today, then why do scholars continue to fixate almost exclusively on Calvin when they discuss this
Margery Kempe and Translations of the Flesh
Language: en
Pages: 268
Authors: Karma Lochrie
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-07-24 - Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

Selected by Choice magazine as an Outstanding Academic Book for 1999 Karma Lochrie demonstrates that women were associated not with the body but rather with the flesh, that disruptive aspect of body and soul which Augustine claimed was fissured with the Fall of Man. It is within this framework that
THE WORKS OF THE FLESH AND YOUTHFUL LUSTS
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: GODSWORD GODSWILL ONU
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: - Publisher: Lulu.com

Books about THE WORKS OF THE FLESH AND YOUTHFUL LUSTS
The Appropriation of Divine Life in Cyril of Alexandria
Language: en
Pages: 315
Authors: Daniel A. Keating
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004-02-12 - Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

Daniel A. Keating presents a comprehensive account of sanctification and divinization in Cyril. He argues that Cyril correlates the somatic and pneumatic means of our union with Christ, and integrates the ontological and ethical aspects of our sanctification and divinization.