Social Media in Northern Chile

Based on 15 months of ethnographic research in the city of Alto Hospicio in northern Chile, this book describes how the residents use social media, and the consequences of this use in their daily lives.

Social Media in Northern Chile


More Books:

Social Media in Northern Chile
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Nell Haynes
Categories: SOCIAL SCIENCE
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016 - Publisher:

Books about Social Media in Northern Chile
Social Media in Northern Chile
Language: en
Pages: 230
Authors: Nell Haynes
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-06-06 - Publisher: UCL Press

Based on 15 months of ethnographic research in the city of Alto Hospicio in northern Chile, this book describes how the residents use social media, and the consequences of this use in their daily lives. Nell Haynes argues that social media is a place where Alto Hospicio’s residents – or
Social Media in Northern Chile
Language: en
Pages: 230
Authors: Nell Haynes
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-06-06 - Publisher: UCL Press

Based on 15 months of ethnographic research in the city of Alto Hospicio in northern Chile, this book describes how the residents use social media, and the consequences of this use in their daily lives. Nell Haynes argues that social media is a place where Alto Hospicio’s residents – or
Social Media in Trinidad
Language: en
Pages: 262
Authors: Jolynna Sinanan
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-11-21 - Publisher: UCL Press

Drawing on 15 months of ethnographic research in one of the most under-developed regions in the Caribbean island of Trinidad, this book describes the uses and consequences of social media for its residents. Jolynna Sinanan argues that this semi-urban town is a place in-between: somewhere city dwellers look down on
Social Media in Emergent Brazil
Language: en
Pages: 260
Authors: Juliano Spyer
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-10-23 - Publisher: UCL Press

Since the popularisation of the internet, low-income Brazilians have received little government support to help them access it. In response, they have largely self-financed their digital migration. Internet cafés became prosperous businesses in working-class neighbourhoods and rural settlements, and, more recently, families have aspired to buy their own home computer