Nemesius of Emesa on Human Nature

During the Renaissance there were numerous print editions helping to inspire a new discourse of human dignity. David Lloyd Dusenbury offers the first monograph in English on Nemesius' treatise.

Nemesius of Emesa on Human Nature

Nemesius of Emesa's On Human Nature (De Natura Hominis) is the first Christian anthropology. Written in Greek, circa 390 CE, it was read in half a dozen languages—from Baghdad to Oxford—well into the early modern period. Nemesius' text circulated in two Latin versions in the centuries that saw the rise of European universities, shaping scholastic theories of human nature. During the Renaissance there were numerous print editions helping to inspire a new discourse of human dignity. David Lloyd Dusenbury offers the first monograph in English on Nemesius' treatise. In the interpretation offered here, the Syrian bishop seeks to define the human qua human. His early Christian anthropology is cosmopolitan. He writes, 'Things that are natural are the same for all.' In his pages, a host of texts and discourses—biblical and medical, legal and philosophical—are made to converge upon a decisive tenet of Christian late antiquity: humans' natural freedom. For Nemesius, reason and choice are a divine double-strand of powers. Since he believes that both are a natural human inheritance, he concludes that much is 'in our power'. Nemesius defines humans as the only living beings who are at once ruler (intellect) and ruled (body). Because of this, the human is a 'little world', binding the rationality of angels to the flux of elements, the tranquillity of plants, and the impulsiveness of animals. This compelling study traces Nemesius' reasoning through the whole of On Human Nature, as he seeks to give a long-influential image of humankind both philosophical and anatomical proof.

More Books:

Nemesius of Emesa on Human Nature
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: David Lloyd Dusenbury
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-08-20 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Nemesius of Emesa's On Human Nature (De Natura Hominis) is the first Christian anthropology. Written in Greek, circa 390 CE, it was read in half a dozen languages—from Baghdad to Oxford—well into the early modern period. Nemesius' text circulated in two Latin versions in the centuries that saw the rise
On the Nature of Man
Language: en
Pages: 273
Authors: Nemesius (Bp. of Emesa.)
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008 - Publisher: Translated Texts for Historian

On the Nature of Man is an invaluable text for historians of ancient thought, not only as a much contested source of evidence for earlier works now lost, but also as a vivid illustration of intellectual life in the late fourth century. Nemesius, its author, was a Christian bishop who
The New Adam
Language: en
Pages: 242
Authors: Ron Highfield
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-04-23 - Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

Have you ever found yourself repeating expressions such as “Jesus saves” or “Jesus died for our sins” without really understanding them? When popular speakers “explain” how Jesus’s death satisfied God’s wrath so you could be forgiven, do you ever think to yourself, “I don’t get it”? If so, you’re not
Animals as Religious Subjects
Language: en
Pages: 310
Authors: Celia Deane-Drummond, David L. Clough, Becky Artinian-Kaiser
Categories: Nature
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-08-15 - Publisher: A&C Black

This book examines one of the most pressing cultural concerns that surfaced in the last decade - the question of the place and significance of the animal. This collection of essays represents the outcome of various conversations regarding the animal studies and shows multidisciplinarity at its very best, namely, a
Embodied Difference
Language: en
Pages: 268
Authors: Jamie A. Thomas, Christina Jackson
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-02-20 - Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

Focusing on the body as a visual and discursive platform across public space, this book explores marginalization as a sociocultural practice and hegemonic schema. The chapters center upon physical contexts, discursive spaces, and philosophical arenas to deconstruct seemingly intrinsic connections between body and behavior, whiteness, and normativity.