Negotiating Well being in Central Asia

Yet religion may be perceived as a threat by states and secular elites, and its role in contributing to the sense of wellness reported by many of our Central Asian interlocutors may be underplayed. As Cynthia Werner, Holly Barcus and ...

Negotiating Well being in Central Asia

Much scholarship of any region focuses on the perceived problems that hold back a population. Central Asia is no exception, as it is a region with political, economic, and environmental problems that seem to keep Central Asians from a "better" future. Alongside all the struggles of life, however, are relationships of meaning and wellness that contribute to a "life worth living." Recognizing the struggles of everyday life, contributors to this book explore how people navigate relationships to find meaning, how elders attempt to re-establish morality, and how development workers pursue new futures. Such futures centre around the role of family, friends, and meaningful employment in yielding contentment; and the influence of Islam, ethnicity, and hospitality on community. The first regional collection to take well-being as a frame of analysis, the contributors show how visions, spaces, and cosmologies of well-being inform everyday life in Central Asia. This volume will appeal not only to those interested in Central Asia, but more broadly to anyone concerned with how taking well-being into account better captures the complex realities of life in any region. This book was published as a special issue of Central Asian Survey.

More Books:

Negotiating Well-being in Central Asia
Language: en
Pages: 144
Authors: David W. Montgomery
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-02-05 - Publisher: Routledge

Much scholarship of any region focuses on the perceived problems that hold back a population. Central Asia is no exception, as it is a region with political, economic, and environmental problems that seem to keep Central Asians from a "better" future. Alongside all the struggles of life, however, are relationships
Practices of Traditionalization in Central Asia
Language: en
Pages: 126
Authors: Judith Beyer, Peter Finke
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-06-30 - Publisher: Routledge

Practices of Traditionalization in Central Asia focuses on how tradition is ‘everyday-ified’ in contemporary Central Asia, including Tatarstan and Tibet, and what people seek to achieve in its name. The case studies range from political demonstrations and industrial workers’ gatherings to institutions of religious education, minority communities, weddings, and the
Nationalism in Central Asia
Language: en
Pages: 368
Authors: Nick Megoran
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-09-29 - Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

Nick Megoran explores the process of building independent nation-states in post-Soviet Central Asia through the lens of the disputed border territory between Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan. In his rich "biography" of the boundary, he employs a combination of political, cultural, historical, ethnographic, and geographic frames to shed new light on nation-building
Everyday Energy Politics in Central Asia and the Caucasus
Language: en
Pages: 144
Authors: David Gullette, Jeanne Féaux de la Croix
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-10-02 - Publisher: Routledge

The perception of Central Asia and its place in the world has come to be shaped by its large oil and gas reserves. Literature on energy in the region has thus largely focused on related geopolitical issues and national policies. However, little is known about citizens’ needs within this broader
Images of the Post-Soviet Kazakshtan
Language: en
Pages: 170
Authors: Suchandana Chatterjee
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-10-25 - Publisher: Routledge

The study revolves round the relationship between space and transitional identity in Kazakhstan in the post-Soviet period. Emergent discourses about cosmopolitanism suggest multiple interactions in a transitional space. The cosmopolitanism of our times implies the dynamic responses of communities in transition. The diversities and heterogeneities instead of the specifics, the