Knock Me Up Knock Me Down

Kelly Oliver investigates this curious shift and its reflection of changing attitudes toward women's roles in reproduction and the family. Not all representations signify progress.

Knock Me Up  Knock Me Down

No longer is pregnancy a repulsive or shameful condition in Hollywood films, but an attractive attribute, often enhancing the romantic or comedic storyline of a female character. Kelly Oliver investigates this curious shift and its reflection of changing attitudes toward women's roles in reproduction and the family. Not all representations signify progress. Oliver finds that in many pregnancy films, our anxieties over modern reproductive practices and technologies are made manifest, and in some cases perpetuate conventions curtailing women's freedom. Reading such films as Where the Heart Is (2000), Riding in Cars with Boys (2001), Palindromes (2004), Saved! (2004), Quinceañera (2006), Children of Men (2006), Knocked Up (2007), Juno (2007), Baby Mama (2008), Away We Go (2009), Precious (2009), The Back-up Plan (2010), Due Date (2010), and Twilight: Breaking Dawn (2011), Oliver investigates pregnancy as a vehicle for romance, a political issue of "choice," a representation of the hosting of "others," a prism for fears of miscegenation, and a screen for modern technological anxieties.

More Books:

Knock Me Up, Knock Me Down
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Kelly Oliver
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-10-09 - Publisher: Columbia University Press

No longer is pregnancy a repulsive or shameful condition in Hollywood films, but an attractive attribute, often enhancing the romantic or comedic storyline of a female character. Kelly Oliver investigates this curious shift and its reflection of changing attitudes toward women's roles in reproduction and the family. Not all representations
Knock Me Up, Knock Me Down
Language: en
Pages: 232
Authors: Kelly Oliver
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012 - Publisher: Columbia University Press

No longer is pregnancy a repulsive or shameful condition in Hollywood films, but an attractive attribute, often enhancing the romantic or comedic storyline of a female character. Kelly Oliver investigates this curious shift and its reflection of changing attitudes toward women's roles in reproduction and the family. Not all representations
Philosophical Feminism and Popular Culture
Language: en
Pages: 210
Authors: Sharon Crasnow, Joanne Waugh
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-12-06 - Publisher: Lexington Books

The eight essays contained in this book explore the portrayal of women, and various philosophical responses to that portrayal in contemporary post-civil rights society. They bring feminist voices to the conversation about gender and attests to the importance of feminist critique in what is sometimes claimed to be a post-feminist
Pregnancy in Literature and Film
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Parley Ann Boswell
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-03-13 - Publisher: McFarland

This exploration of the ways in which pregnancy affects narrative begins with two canonical American texts, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter (1848) and Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861). Relying on such diverse works as Frankenstein, Peyton Place, Beloved, and I Love Lucy, the book
Affective Sexual Pedagogies in Film and Television
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Kyra Clarke
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-02-17 - Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Popular film and television hold valuable potential for learning about sex and sexuality beyond the information-based model of sex education currently in schools. This book argues that the representation of complicated—or "messy"—relationships in these popular cultural forms makes them potent as affective pedagogical moments. It endeavours to develop new sexual