Dangerous Digestion

is risky and, like collaborative political processes, is always somewhat uncontrolled and unpredictable. ... If ingestion provides the metaphor for a narrative about safety, the dangers excluded, digestion stories tell us about how ...

Dangerous Digestion

Throughout American history, ingestion (eating) has functioned as a metaphor for interpreting and imagining this society and its political systems. Discussions of American freedom itself are pervaded with ingestive metaphors of choice (what to put in) and control (what to keep out). From the country’s founders to the abolitionists to the social activists of today, those seeking to form and reform American society have cast their social-change goals in ingestive terms of choice and control. But they have realized their metaphors in concrete terms as well, purveying specific advice to the public about what to eat or not. These conversations about “social change as eating” reflect American ideals of freedom, purity, and virtue. Drawing on social and political history as well as the history of science and popular culture, Dangerous Digestion examines how American ideas about dietary reform mirror broader thinking about social reform. Inspired by new scientific studies of the human body as a metabiome—a collaboration of species rather than an isolated, intact, protected, and bounded individual—E. Melanie DuPuis invokes a new metaphor—digestion—to reimagine the American body politic, opening social transformations to ideas of mixing, fermentation, and collaboration. In doing so, the author explores how social activists can rethink politics as inclusive processes that involve the inherently risky mixing of cultures, standpoints, and ideas.

More Books:

Dangerous Digestion
Language: en
Pages: 232
Authors: E. Melanie DuPuis
Categories: Cooking
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-12-01 - Publisher: Univ of California Press

Throughout American history, ingestion (eating) has functioned as a metaphor for interpreting and imagining this society and its political systems. Discussions of American freedom itself are pervaded with ingestive metaphors of choice (what to put in) and control (what to keep out). From the country’s founders to the abolitionists to
A Geography of Digestion
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Nicholas Bauch
Categories: Cooking
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-10-25 - Publisher: Univ of California Press

"A Geography of Digestion explores the legacy of the Kellogg Company, one of America's most enduring and storied food enterprises. In the late nineteenth century, company founder John H. Kellogg was experimenting with state-of-the-art advances in nutritional and medical science at his Battle Creek Sanitarium. At the same time, he
The Fruits of Empire
Language: en
Pages: 264
Authors: Shana Klein
Categories: Fruit
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020 - Publisher:

The Fruits of Empire is a history of American expansion through the lens of art and food. In the decades after the Civil War, Americans consumed an unprecedented amount of fruit as it grew more accessible with advancements in refrigeration and transportation technologies. This excitement for fruit manifested in an
Food Across Borders
Language: en
Pages: 290
Authors: Matt Garcia, E. Melanie DuPuis, Don Mitchell
Categories: Cooking
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-10-17 - Publisher: Rutgers University Press

The act of eating defines and redefines borders. What constitutes “American” in our cuisine has always depended on a liberal crossing of borders, from “the line in the sand” that separates Mexico and the United States, to the grassland boundary with Canada, to the imagined divide in our collective minds
Food and Feast in Modern Outlaw Tales
Language: en
Pages: 232
Authors: Alexander L. Kaufman, Penny Vlagopoulos
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-03-21 - Publisher: Routledge

This collection of scholarly essays presents new work from in an emerging line of inquiry: modern outlaw narratives and the textual and cultural relevance of food and feasting. Food, its preparation and its consumption, is presented in outlaw narratives as central points of human interaction, community, conflict, and fellowship. Feast