Achilles beside Gilgamesh

Interprets the poetic meaning of the Iliad in relation to the heroic literature of the Ancient Near East.

Achilles beside Gilgamesh

Interprets the poetic meaning of the Iliad in relation to the heroic literature of the Ancient Near East.

More Books:

Achilles beside Gilgamesh
Language: en
Pages: 920
Authors: Michael Clarke
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-11-28 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Interprets the poetic meaning of the Iliad in relation to the heroic literature of the Ancient Near East.
Gods and Mortals in Early Greek and Near Eastern Mythology
Language: en
Pages: 400
Authors: Adrian Kelly, Christopher Metcalf
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-05-06 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Explores the interaction between Greece and the Ancient Near East through stories about the gods and their relationships with humankind.
Thales the Measurer
Language: en
Pages: 226
Authors: Livio Rossetti
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2022-07-01 - Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Thales the Measurer offers a comprehensive and iconoclastic account of Thales of Miletus, considering the full extent of our evidence to build a new picture of his intellectual interests and activity. Thales is most commonly associated with the claim that ‘everything is water’, but closer examination of the evidence that
The Origins and Role of Same-Sex Relations in Human Societies
Language: en
Pages: 478
Authors: James Neill
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-10-27 - Publisher: McFarland

This groundbreaking work draws on a vast range of research into human sexuality to demonstrate that homosexuality is not a phenomenon limited to a small minority of society, but is an aspect of a complex sexual harmony that the human race inherited from its animal ancestors. Through a survey of
Homer Beside Himself
Language: en
Pages: 398
Authors: Maureen Alden
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2001-03-08 - Publisher: OUP Oxford

Students reading the Iliad for the first time are often bewildered by the sheer volume of information on apparently unrelated subjects contained in it. The central narrative seems to unfold very slowly, and to be complicated by long speeches containing stories which might be interesting in themselves, but which seem